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These organic Bartlett pears from Trader Joe’s seem to be seedless. Their seeds seem mostly white and thin with some black mixed in. Kind of like the “seeds” in seedless watermelon. The seeds are shown on the right side of the open pear.

Trader Joe’s private label foods claim to be non-GMO. So are these pears truly non-GMO organic? Is it possible to cross breed organic pears to be seedless? Was there GMO cross contamination?

Twitter answer: @farmwars: @JJDippold Bartlett pears normally have seeds - in Sacramento Valley, they often are seedless because of the favorable climate.

Pop Music is a Control System

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It is commonly known that corporations own and control every aspect of pop music, from the singer to the radio stations. So let’s look at pop music itself.

Pop music is played everywhere to everyone all the time. It’s on TV. It’s in the grocery store, in the restaurants where you eat. It’s wherever you get your hair cut. People blast pop music out of their cars and in the park. Escaping pop music is hard. 

The public is so accustomed to hearing music, talk and noise that people become uncomfortable in silence. Few have the time, environment or accepted mindset for quiet reflection. 

The format of pop music radio is one of repetition. It starts with the song itself. A chorus or song line is repeated over and over with the purpose of searing itself into your memory. It’s like a magical mantra. 

Then there’s the next level of repetition: limited, repeating, preset playlists. Only certain songs play again and again, day after day.

As these few carefully chosen songs play over and over again, everywhere, they gain a type of power. It also makes any commercials stand out as novel material.

Pop music is emotional. By limiting the songs played, the gatekeepers of corporate media limit the listener’s emotions. They set the cultural norms of what it is acceptable to feel.

Pop music is sticky. I only take in a few pop songs a day, not entirely by choice, and they usually get stuck in my head. If a song is playing in your mind you can think of little else. There is also the peculiar phenomenon of a song popping into your mind during different life situations, unless, of course, actual music is playing.

I’m not saying ban pop music. Realize it can be intoxicating. This is the information age. So much music exists. Don’t limit yourself to only pop music. Feel something new. Expand your emotions. Above all pay attention to what effects media is having on you. 

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